Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises programme

This programme supports research institutes and humanitarian organisations who want to strengthen the evidence base for public health interventions. The aim is to improve health outcomes in humanitarian crises.

The programme is managed by Elrha and is a partnership between the UK Department for International Development (DFID), Wellcome, and the UK National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).

Scheme at a glance

Career stage:

Where your host organisation is based:

  • UK,
  • Republic of Ireland,
  • ,
  • Rest of the world

Type of researcher:

  • ,
  • Clinical,
  • Public health

Level of funding:

An overall budget of about £3.5 million for each call

Duration of funding:

Up to 48 months

Who can apply

Organisations with a strong track record in humanitarian health research can apply to the Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises programme (also known as ‘R2HC’).

The lead applicant should be one of the following:

  • research institution
  • non-profit institution or NGO (non-governmental organisation)
  • UN agency.

All applications must be jointly submitted by at least one research institute and one operational humanitarian organisation who propose to work in partnership.

Partnerships must include at least one academic/research institution from the country or region where the research will take place.

You can find out more about eligibility for this programme on the Elrha website.

What we're looking for

We're looking for proposals that fit with the aims of our programme, which are to:

  • improve health outcomes by strengthening the evidence base for public health interventions in humanitarian crises
  • encourage world-class research through fostering collaboration between operational humanitarian agencies and research organisations
  • bridge the gap between research and practice in relation to public health interventions in humanitarian crises.

Your proposal should focus on one or more of the following areas within the context of a humanitarian crisis:

  • public health priorities that lack a solid existing evidence base
  • public health interventions that are not specific to the context of a humanitarian crisis − how they can be adapted and delivered in this context, and their effectiveness maximised
  • health systems, including the coordination of the public health response
  • specific interventions designed to improve health outcomes, such as cash transfers.

We encourage applications that involve organisations based in countries most affected by humanitarian crises.

You can choose between two types of proposal:

  1. core grants
  2. rapid response grants (in the acute phase of a crisis).

Other schemes

Joint Health Systems Research Initiative

Supporting research based in low- and middle-income countries to improve health systems in those locations.
Full details of Joint Health Systems Research Initiative
Scheme finder

There is an annual call for applications, with an overall budget of about £3.5 million for each call.

Find out more on the Elrha website.

You can apply to the R2HC programme on the Elrha website.

Please don’t apply to Wellcome.

Dates

  • Call opens

    4 June 2019

  • Deadline for expressions of interest

    16 July 2019

  • Successful applicants invited to submit full proposals

    September 2019

  • Full proposal deadline

    December 2019 (date tbc)

  • Announcement of successful applicants

    April 2020

More information

Find out about how we've worked with the funding community to develop principles and obligations setting out what we expect from those responsible for clinical training, trainees and funders across the UK.

Funding partners

Key dates

  • Call opens

    4 June 2019

  • Deadline for expressions of interest

    16 July 2019

  • Successful applicants invited to submit full proposals

    September 2019

  • Full proposal deadline

    December 2019 (date tbc)

  • Announcement of successful applicants

    April 2020

Contact us

If you have a question, contact the R2HC team: